Venus Consoling Love – (François Boucher) предишен Следващия


художник:

стил: Rococo

Теми: Gods;Love;Nudes

Техника: Oil

Venus Consoling Love (1751) is an oil on canvas painting by François Boucher. This is another panel from the "bathroom" series commissioned by Madam de Pompadour in 1751. Like The Toilette of Venus, the subject matter is the goddess of love, an appropriate theme for the King's mistress's bathroom. The particular theme of this painting is a playful treatment of a popular theme: Venus disciplining her son Cupid. According to the legends, Cupid has a bow and arrow with which he can shoot humans and make them fall in love. Cupid is a gleeful youngster and loves to use his arrows, often in mischevous and even harmful ways. So his mother, as the goddess of love, frequently had to discipline him. She is shown here taking away his quiver of arrows, much to the enjoyment of the other putti, winged creatures like Cupid, but lacking his ability to force people into love. This painting (53 x 67 cm) is now in the Collection of National Gallery of Art Washington DC.

This artwork is in the public domain.

художник

François Boucher

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Free for non commercial use. See below.

François Boucher – Най-гледани Произведения

Public domain

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. However - you may not use this image for commercial purposes and you may not alter the image or remove the watermark.

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Note that a few countries have copyright terms longer than 70 years: Mexico has 100 years, Colombia has 80 years, and Guatemala and Samoa have 75 years. This image may not be in the public domain in these countries, which moreover do not implement the rule of the shorter term. Côte d'Ivoire has a general copyright term of 99 years and Honduras has 75 years, but they do implement that rule of the shorter term.