Henry VIII – (Hans Holbein The Younger) Previous Next


Artist:

Date: 1537

Size: 234 x 135 cm

Museum: Walker Art Gallery (Liverpool, United Kingdom)

Technique: Oil On Panel

Portrait of Henry VIII is a lost work by Hans Holbein the Younger depicting Henry VIII. While destroyed by fire in 1698 it is still well known today through many copies. It is one of the most iconic images of Henry and is one of the most famed portraits of any British monarch. It was originally created as a mural at the Palace of Whitehall, London, in 1536 or 1537; the original was destroyed when the palace burned in 1698. Some of Holbein's preparatory works survive, as do a number of period copies of the mural. Henry VIII (1491–1547) was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. He was also Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) and claimant to the Kingdom of France. Henry was the second monarch of the House of Tudor, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Portrait of Henry VIII, after Holbein, (After 1537, possibly c 1567) (233.7 × 134.6 cm) is in the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool.

This artwork is in the public domain.

Artist

Hans Holbein The Younger

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