A Group of Cottages – (Vincent Van Gogh) Previous Next


Artist:

Topic: Cottages

Date: 1890

Size: 60 x 73 cm

Museum: The State Hermitage Museum (Russia)

Technique: Oil On Canvas

A group of Cottages is thought to be the study he mentions in his letter of 21 May 1890 to his brother Theo and wife Jo immediately after arriving in Auvers:"... when I wrote to you I hadn’t yet done anything. Now I have a study of old thatched roofs with a field of peas in flower and some wheat in the foreground, hilly background. A study which I think you’ll like." Hulsker believes the painting is amongst a group of 20 or so works executed by Vincent immediately after his arrival in Auvers, May 20, and the remainder of the month:" ... we immediately see in this painting the bright colors that, generally speaking, are characteristic of the Auvers period and differentiate them somewhat from the paintings done in Saint-Rémy - although there is naturally no question of a real break with the past from one week to the next." The painting is in the collection of the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg.

This artwork is in the public domain.

Artist

Vincent Van Gogh

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