The Day After – (Edvard Munch) Previous Next


Artists:

Style: Expressionism

Topics: Food

Date: 1850

Size: 115 x 152 cm

Museum: Nasjonalgalleriet (Oslo, Norway)

Technique: Oil On Canvas

Gallery, Oslo, in 1909 the public was shocked; one critic denounced it as portraying a drunken prostitute. This is unlikely to have been Munch's idea. He did paint several pictures of prostitutes, tending to depict them as unattractive or even grotesque, whereas this woman closely resembles the Madonna and, different though the setting, shares her ethereal beauty. She is probably intended to illustrate one aspect of the essence of protean womanhood portrayed in that work. Both paintings in fact relate to a lost picture by Munch that Hans Jaeger had with him in his prison cell when jailed in 1886 for publishing From Christiania's Bohemia, a novel in which descriptions of free bohemian life parallel what is shown here. The present picture is more directly a replica, modified by his style of the 1890s, of the same subject painted in 1885-86 and also lost. One important Norwegian precedent for the depiction of a dissolute woman would undoubtedly have been known to Munch, Hans Heyerdahl's tiny, exquisite painting of The Champagne Girl, which was also strongly attacked when exhibited. If Munch's picture represents The Day After, Heyerdahl's might be called 'The Evening Before.'

This artwork is in the public domain.

Artists

Edvard Munch

Download

Click here to download

Permissions

Free for non commercial use. See below.

Edvard Munch – Most viewed artworks

Public domain

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired. However - you may not use this image for commercial purposes and you may not alter the image or remove the watermark.

This applies to the United States, Canada, the European Union and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years.


Note that a few countries have copyright terms longer than 70 years: Mexico has 100 years, Colombia has 80 years, and Guatemala and Samoa have 75 years. This image may not be in the public domain in these countries, which moreover do not implement the rule of the shorter term. Côte d'Ivoire has a general copyright term of 99 years and Honduras has 75 years, but they do implement that rule of the shorter term.